Ibadan through the lens of SupaShegs

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Ibadan through the lenses of SupaShegs

He started taking pictures when he was in school (YABATECH) during a photo walk  along a street. He borrowed his brother’s camera for this particular which also involved working and walking with some professional photographers. This is the story of Olusegun  Aderinto, SupaShegs, one of the extremely talented photographers that I follow on social media.

Interestingly though, he stays  in Ibadan even though he now spends more time in the Niger-Delta region of the country.

Since the photo walk, he said the passion for photography has  been burning within him until he could afford to buy a professional camera.

His specialties are landscape and documentaries. He has shot different places in Ibadan, Ijebu Ode, Delta state, Lagos and more states.

In terms of his uniqueness as a photographer, SupaShegs told IBPulse that lots of photographers are making great images – he said he is interested in keeping memories, passing messages, touching people’s hearts from the images he creates.

“I try to connect people to the normal things that they see around them daily- but they don’t pay attention to. I’m showing you – hello, see this, look at this,” he said.

One of my favorite SupaShegs’ shots is the one of a lizard (check it out below). So I asked him about the story behind it.

“Nature is fun to shoot because they are always there posing for you to take their pictures. What you just need to do is to apply little techniques you’ve learned over time,” he said.

I also asked him who is more difficult to shoot – human beings or animals?

“It depends, because human beings are every sensible people you can easily direct them and control them. But animals, you can not just tell a dog to stand up easily except for the over-trained ones – except you just see them taking a nap or naturally at a pose. But human beings could be easily directed,” he said.

Concerning the landscape in Ibadan, he said the city is an ancient one – a lot of the red zincs.

“People think taking those pictures are painting Ibadan bad. Ibadan is an ancient city which is developing to a modern town. It is now a blend of ‘ancient’ and ‘modern’. With time you will see this ancient part is moving away. If we don’t take these pictures, if wee don’t document them for generations to come, nobody will believe that Ibadan has been like this,” he told IBPulse.

He however mentioned  that not all ancient structures in Ibadan appear ancient – take the Cocoa House for instance.

“Even though the Cocoa House is an ancient building, it doesn’t appear ancient. When shot it looks modern.”

Then I asked about his most exciting shots in Ibadan, then elsewhere. He said he is always fascinated by the Ibadan landscape.

When I took the picture of Cocoa House, it was whao! I was not even prepared to shoot, I just felt like going out to shoot. I also shot Mapo Hall. Even three years after I shot Mapo Hall, I was editing the picture again and I was still wowed at the columns and the architectural works embedded in the Mapo building. You cannot find such in modern day architecture,” he said.

SupaShegs studied architecture which was why I could relate to his fascination with Mapo Hall. I then asked him how architecture influences him as a photographer.

“It gives you eye to details because architecture does not joke with details – everything must be to details.. With that culture in you, when you are taking pictures you take note of details. Let’s say you are shooting a wedding. You have to take note of the rings, the hairdo, the shoes, the little button that a normal person will not see – you bring such out for the guy getting married to see.. It’s all about details.”

Check out his amazing works in Ibadan below. You can download them and use as wallpaper, screensaver…

IMG-20150627-WA0007_0

Bodija

Bodija

 

The Iconic Mapo Hall

The Iconic Mapo Hall

Adekunle Fajuyi Statue

Adekunle Fajuyi Statue

The Iconic Mapo Hall

The Iconic Mapo Hall

Red roofs

Red roofs

 

 

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